Tag Archives: stock

EP40 (Part 2) Five More Don’ts For Investors by Philip Fisher



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

The content of this episode was from Philip Fisher’s book (Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits: https://amzn.to/2QRM7mR)

We continue to discuss five more mistakes by investors that Philip Fisher mentioned in his book.

  1. Don’t overstress diversification
  2. Don’t forget your Gilbert and Sullivan
  3. Dont be afraid of buying on a war scare
  4. Don’t fail to consider time as well as price in buying a true growth stock
  5. Don’t follow the crowd

EP39 (Part 1) Five Don’ts For Investors By Philip Fisher



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

The content of this episode was from Philip Fisher’s book (Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits: https://amzn.to/2QRM7mR)

This episode covers Philip Fisher’s advice on the five things that investors shouldn’t do.

  1. Don’t buy into promotional companies
  2. Don’t ignore a good stock just because it is traded “over the counter”
  3. Don’t buy a stock just because you like the tone of its annual report
  4. Don’t assume that the high price at which a stock may be selling in relation to earnings is necessarily an indication that further growth in those earnings has largely been already discounted in the price
  5. Don’t quibble over eighths and quarters

EP38 Philip Fisher – When To SELL Stocks



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

The last episode covered Philip Fisher’s advice on when to BUY stocks and this episode covers when to SELL stocks.

The content of this episode was from Philip Fisher’s book (Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits: https://amzn.to/2QRM7mR)


EP36 (Part 2) Philip Fisher’s 15 Points On What Stocks To Buy



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

We continue to talk about the remaining 7 points (out of 15 points) that Philip Fisher checks when buying a company.  The content of this episode was from his book (Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits: https://amzn.to/2QRM7mR)

  • Does the company have depth to its management?
  • How good are the company’s cost analysis and accounting controls?
  • Are the other aspects of the business, somewhat peculiar to the industry involved, which will give the investor important clues as to how outstanding the company may be in relation to its competition?
  • Does the company have a short-range or long-range outlook in regard to profits?
  • In the foreseeable future will the growth of the company require sufficient equity financing so that the larger number of shares then outstanding will largely cancel the existing stockholders’ benefit from this anticipated growth?
  • Does the management talk freely to investors about its affairs when things are going well but “clam up” when troubles and disappointments occur?
  • Does the company have a management of unquestionable integrity?

EP34 Master Limited Partnership Investments by Peter Lynch



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

This episode covers how Peter Lynch utilized Master Limited Partnership (MLP) investment opportunities in the stock market.  The content of this episode was from his book (Beating the Street: https://amzn.to/2yklmzj)

List of current MLPs: https://www.mlpassociation.org/mlp-101/list-of-current-mlps/


EP31 (Part3) Peter Lynch Investing Golden Rules



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Beating the Street by Peter Lynch: https://amzn.to/2yklmzj

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

We continue to talk about the investing rules by Peter Lynch and this episode covers the following 8 rules.

  1. There is always something to worry about. Avoid weekend thinking and ignore the latest dire predictions of the newscasters. Sell a stock because the company’s fundamentals deteriorate, not because the sky is falling.
  2. Nobody can predict interest rates, the future direction of the economy, or the stock market. Dismiss all such forecasts and concentrate on what’s actually happening to the companies in which you’ve invested.
  3. If you study 10 companies, you’ll find 1 for which the story is better than expected. If you study 50, you’ll find 5. There are always pleasant surprises to be found in the stock market – companies whose achievements are being overlooked on Wall Street.
  4. If you don’t study any companies, you’ll have the same success buying stocks as you do in a poker game if you bet without looking at your cards.
  5. Time is on your side when you own shares of superior companies. You can afford to be patient – even if you missed Wal-Mart in the first five years, it was a great stock to own in the next five years. Time is against you when you own options.
  6. If you have the stomach for stocks, but neither the time nor the inclination to do the homework, invest in equity mutual funds. Here, it’s a good idea to diversify. You should own a few different kinds of funds, with managers who pursue different styles of investing: growth, value, small companies, large companies, etc. Investing in six of the same kind of fund is not diversification. The capital gains tax penalizes investors who do too much switching from one mutual fund to another. If you’ve invested in one fund or several funds that have done well, don’t abandon them capriciously. Stick with them.
  7. Among the major markets of the world, the U.S. market ranks eighth in total return over the past decade. You can take advantage of the faster-growing economies by investing some of your assets in an overseas fund with a good record.
  8. In the long run, a portfolio of well-chosen stocks and/or equity mutual funds will always outperform a portfolio of bonds or a money-market account. In the long run, a portfolio of poorly chosen stocks won’t outperform the money left under the mattress.

EP29 (Part1) Peter Lynch Investing Golden Rules



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Beating the Street by Peter Lynch: https://amzn.to/2yklmzj

Subscribe to the podcast: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/subscribe-to-podcast/

This episode covers the first 9 investing rules by Peter Lynch

  1. Investing is fun, exciting, and dangerous if you don’t do any work.
  2. Your investor’s edge is not something you get from Wall Street experts. It’s something you already have. You can outperform the experts if you use your edge by investing in companies or industries you already understand.
  3. Over the past three decades, the stock market has come to be dominated by a herd of professional investors. Contrary to popular belief, this makes it easier for the amateur investor. You can beat the market by ignoring the herd.
  4. Behind every stock is a company, find out what it’s doing.
  5. Often, there is no correlation between the success of a company’s operations and the success of its stock over a few months or even a few years. In the long term, there is a 100 percent correlation between the success of the company and the success of its stock. This disparity is the key to making money; it pays to be patient, and to own successful companies.
  6. You have to know what you own, and why you own it. “This baby is a cinch to go up!” doesn’t count.
  7. Long shots almost always miss the mark.
  8. Owning stocks is like having children – don’t get involved with more than you can handle. The part-time stock picker probably has time to follow 8-12 companies, and to buy and sell shares as conditions warrant. There don’t have to be more than 5 companies in the portfolio at any time.
  9. If you can’t find any companies that you think are attractive, put your money into the bank until you discover some.

EP22 Investment Basics (Part 2) by Joel Greenblatt



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

Joel Greenblatt is a legendary value investor who founded a hedge fund Gotham Capital with an astonishing track record of 40% annualized return from 1985 to 2006.  This episode covers the second part of the investment basics that Joel discussed in his book (You Can Be a Stock Market GENIUS).

  • Don’t buy more stocks; Put money in the bank
  • Look down, not up
  • There’s more than one road to investment heaven

The future episodes will cover the details of great special investment opportunities such as spin-offs, merger securities, restructurings, rights offerings, etc.


EP19 Bank Analysis (Part 2): Financial Statements



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

I will create three episodes to explain the basics of analyzing bank stocks which are a black box to many investors. This episode covers how you can analyze banks’ financial statements (balance sheet and income statement), which are vastly different from the financial statements in non-financial companies.  The next episode will cover the steps that you can follow to identify undervalued bank stocks.

Click here (The Bank Investor’s Handbook) to learn more about the book referenced in this episode.


EP17 Capital Allocation Policy (Reinvesting, Dividends, vs. Share-repurchases)



Support this podcast through your donation: https://paypal.me/valueinvesting

This episode covers how management’s decision on capital allocation policy can greatly affect the value of your investment in the long term.  Earnings/capital can be allocated in various ways. Warren Buffet mentioned in his shareholder letters as to when it makes sense to use one option vs. the other.  Later, I discuss how you can get a hint of whether the management team acts in the best interest of long-term shareholders.

The following capital allocation options are discussed in this episode.

  • Reinvested back into the business to maintain the current operation
  • Reinvested back into the business to grow the business
  • Used to acquire other businesses via M&A deals
  • Parked and invested in marketable securities such as Treasury Bills
  • Distributed to shareholders in the form of dividends
  • Distributed to shareholders through share-repurchase program

Podcast website: http://valueinvesting.blubrry.net/